Product Safety

ACCC urges caution with DIY vehicle maintenance

Around 120 Australians have died as a result of do it yourself (DIY) car maintenance accidents since 2000, while many hundreds have been hospitalised due to injuries, and the ACCC is warning consumers to take extra care when repairing their vehicles.

The ACCC has developed a safety campaign which includes a video explaining the correct procedure for common DIY car maintenance tasks to help raise awareness about the associated dangers.

More progress is needed in Airbag recalls

The quarterly recall figures for Takata airbags reveal steady progress is being made in the recall but the ACCC is warning motorists not to become complacent.

As at 31 March 2019 around 2.1 million (69 per cent) of vehicles have been rectified leaving around 734,000 (24 per cent) of vehicles remaining.

Around 192,000 (seven per cent) of vehicles have been identified by manufacturers as written off, unregistered for more than two consecutive years, exported, scrapped, stolen or modified and unable to have the airbag replaced.

Unsafe goods should be illegal to sell

There should be a law in Australia prohibiting the sale of unsafe goods, ACCC Chair Rod Sims told the National Consumer Congress in Melbourne today.

Using new data the ACCC estimates the annual cost of injury and death caused by unsafe consumer products is at least $5 billion and could be much more.

Excluding motor vehicle accidents, there are around 780 deaths and around 52,000 injuries per year from consumer products that many Australians have in their homes.

Target and Baby Bunting pay penalties for selling unsafe convertible strollers

Following the issue of infringement notices by the ACCC, Target Australia Pty Ltd and Baby Bunting Pty Ltd have paid penalties totalling $37,800 and $25,200 respectively for selling and marketing unsafe convertible strollers, and have each entered into court enforceable undertakings.

The convertible strollers were marketed as safe to be used as strollers for transporting babies and young children, but did not comply with the mandatory safety standard for prams and strollers.

A million airbags still to be replaced

Australia’s largest ever recall is nearly two thirds progressed with 2.8 million faulty Takata airbags replaced with around 1 million still outstanding.

More than 70 per cent of all affected airbag inflators have been replaced nationally since the Federal Government put manufacturers on notice in February last year.

“Despite good progress, both motorists and car manufacturers shouldn’t become complacent,” ACCC Deputy Chair Delia Rickard said.

“If you receive a letter or call from your car’s manufacturer, don’t delay or ignore it.” 

3000 Takata airbags a day replaced in Australian cars

Australia’s largest ever recall is now well underway with new figures released today detailing the first quarter of compulsory Takata airbag replacements under the Mandatory Recall Notice issued by the Australian Government.

More than 350,000 faulty Takata airbags were replaced in the quarter following 1 July 2018, equal to more than 3,000 replacements each day.

Some 2.5 million faulty Takata airbags have already been replaced in around 1.6 million vehicles to date, since the start of voluntary recalls in 2009.

Half of all Australian homes affected by unsafe products

Faulty products continue to cause serious injury and harm to thousands of Australians, with more than 4.5 million items recalled by suppliers in the 2017-18 financial year.

New figures show at least 10 people a day are injured and require medical attention as a result of unsafe products, according to mandatory reports provided to the ACCC by manufacturers and retailers.

Almost two million deadly Takata airbags still in Australian cars

The ACCC has released comprehensive state-by-state data detailing recall rates for deadly Takata airbags, and the first data detailing progress made by various vehicle manufacturers in removing them from Australian cars.

The ACCC says one year since the ACCC started overseeing the Takata airbag recall,
1.8 million potentially deadly airbags still need replacing as part of a compulsory recall that will run until 2020.

Over the past 12 months, 1.1 million faulty Takata airbags have been replaced in around 930,000 vehicles.